Reviews

2018 Toyota C-HR Driving Impressions


Toyota has given the C-HR respectable handling and roadholding capabilities, significantly beyond the limits of prior small-size Toyota models.

Even when cornering briskly, the C-HR feels secure and well-planted on the pavement. Steering isn’t as numb as that of typical Toyotas, and the ride is smooth, but this crossover/hatchback is no match for Mazda products in terms of handling and precise responses.

Acceleration is a sadder tale. Toyota’s 144-horsepower engine simply cannot provide anything approaching lively performance, pulling a relatively heavy, 3,300 pound-vehicle. At every level of performance, the C-HR can be deemed sluggish, even in Sport mode.

Fuel economy doesn’t compensate for lackluster performance, either. The C-HR is EPA-rated at 27/31 mpg City/Highway, or 29 mpg Combined. Though adequate, those figures hardly constitute thrifty fuel-efficiency in a smaller car. A Honda Fit, for instance, manages an estimated 36 mpg in Combined driving. As measured by its high coefficient of drag (0.34), the C-HR’s body doesn’t come across as particularly aerodynamic.

Engine noise is noticeable, but not trouble. Most howls that emanate from beneath the hood when accelerating are restrained by sound-deadening material.

* MSRP is the Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of the vehicle. Unless specifically indicated in the advertisement, MSRP does not include taxes, fees or other charges. Actual dealer pricing may vary. Consult your dealer for more information and complete details.

* The dealer advertised price may not reflect specific dealer offers, and may be subject to certain terms and conditions as indicated in the advertisement. Consult your dealer for more information and complete details.

* Images and options shown are examples, only, and may not reflect exact vehicle color, trim, options, pricing or other specifications.

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